Do-It-Yourself Detangler 
Over the past few weeks, I’ve become increasingly frustrated and exhausted with the fact that it takes so long to detangle my hair. And as my hair is getting longer, I am realising that I need to be more efficient. I decided to experiment.
The experiment, part 1
To prepare for wash day, instead of doing a prior detangling with an oil, I decided to dampen my hair with water the night before and then saturate my tangled hair into eight sections with my pre-wash day treatment—i.e. organic extra virgin coconut oil o help make the wash day process much smoother. I left it in overnight. 
The experiment, part 2
In the morning, I mixed one of my usual deep conditioning recipes (click here). Then I had a thought: I’ve incorporated shea butter into my deep conditioner before and it gave me great slip every time which helped me tremendously because of it’s thick, buttery consistency. Alikay Naturals Honey & Sage Conditioner is a testament to this, because one of its primary ingredient is shea butter. So, I decided to add a generous tablespoon of my homemade whipped shea butter mix to my deep conditioner (a little goes a long way with it). Then I thought about how I’ve read up in the past that apple cider vinegar was a natural detangler, so I then added about two tablespoons of ACV to my conditioner. 
I was a bit skeptical at first, but oh my gosh! I detangled my hair as I applied my deep conditioner to each section and it literally melted the tangles and knots from my kinky, tightly-curled hair away—both outside and inside the shower. Wash day today took only about two and a half hours, and it was virtually painless. My hair feels great by the way—the use of ACV didn’t produce any drying effects, and the smell is not lingering in my hair. 
I’m so excited! I will definitely be doing this on days when I don’t have the time to detangle my hair the night before. 
Sometimes, wash day truly is a pain in the butt. But, I hope this helps. :-)

Do-It-Yourself Detangler 

Over the past few weeks, I’ve become increasingly frustrated and exhausted with the fact that it takes so long to detangle my hair. And as my hair is getting longer, I am realising that I need to be more efficient. I decided to experiment.

The experiment, part 1

To prepare for wash day, instead of doing a prior detangling with an oil, I decided to dampen my hair with water the night before and then saturate my tangled hair into eight sections with my pre-wash day treatment—i.e. organic extra virgin coconut oil o help make the wash day process much smoother. I left it in overnight. 

The experiment, part 2

In the morning, I mixed one of my usual deep conditioning recipes (click here). Then I had a thought: I’ve incorporated shea butter into my deep conditioner before and it gave me great slip every time which helped me tremendously because of it’s thick, buttery consistency. Alikay Naturals Honey & Sage Conditioner is a testament to this, because one of its primary ingredient is shea butter. So, I decided to add a generous tablespoon of my homemade whipped shea butter mix to my deep conditioner (a little goes a long way with it). Then I thought about how I’ve read up in the past that apple cider vinegar was a natural detangler, so I then added about two tablespoons of ACV to my conditioner. 

I was a bit skeptical at first, but oh my gosh! I detangled my hair as I applied my deep conditioner to each section and it literally melted the tangles and knots from my kinky, tightly-curled hair away—both outside and inside the shower. Wash day today took only about two and a half hours, and it was virtually painless. My hair feels great by the way—the use of ACV didn’t produce any drying effects, and the smell is not lingering in my hair. 

I’m so excited! I will definitely be doing this on days when I don’t have the time to detangle my hair the night before. 

Sometimes, wash day truly is a pain in the butt. But, I hope this helps. :-)



Can you still be manipulating your hair while it's in a protective style with your natural hair? —by Anonymous

Hey! To answer your question, I find that the only way you can really be excessively manipulating your hair is if you are constantly doing protective styles without really giving your hair a break to breathe in between those styles (ie placing too much tension on your hair follicles), or if you are constantly wearing your hair out without really utilising low manipulation or protective styles and techniques. With anything in life, it’s all about balance, moderation and also using good judgement.

It’s important to remember that hair needs a break too! :-)



Where in Italy were you born? Did you happen to ever live in Sicily? —by Anonymous

Hey! No, I was born in Caserta, Italy and I lived in Naples, Italy for four years before moving to the United States :-) Thank you for asking! 



BGLH writes: 

"Are you a product junkie who has some extra cash on hand? Or would you like to really pamper your natural hair with luxurious products? Look no further than this list of high-priced natural hair product companies, based on overall price per ounce."

— Check out this list from BlackGirlLongHair. What’s even more intriguing is that many of these products contain cheap, synthetic ingredients (*cough* Miss Jessie’s *cough*). Why would I purchase a product at such a high price if the ingredients are so less-than? If the product contained all organic and all natural ingredients, then that would be much more understandable. 

What’s been your most expensive natural hair product purchase? Was it worth it?



Is it possible your hair had reach terminal length if it armpit/bra strap length? —by Anonymous

Hey! A lot of naturals have or are experiencing the “APL plateau”, where it feels like the hair is not growing. But it’s important to understand that has hair gets longer, it is need of much more TLC because of how prone it will be to outside elements, and because the ends of your hair are getting much older and thus need protection. 

Also, I’m not very knowledgeable about terminal lengths (that’s more on the scientific side of things related to genetics). But you have to be mindful of what exactly terminal length is. It is not how long your hair will grow and then completely stop growing (hair is always growing), but it is about how long the hair will grow in a certain phase before it sheds

To my understanding, terminal length is how long a certain strand of hair stays in the anagen phase—which is the phase where hair grows. The shorter the stage is means the hair won’t grow very long. The longer the anagen phase is means that the hair has the ability to grow long. You can see just how long your anagen phase is by the length of a strand of hair that has been shed. I know for me personally, some shed strands are really short (again, not all shed hairs are long—short hairs do not always mean breakage!) and some shed hairs are long. It really depends. 

Some will take MSM (organic sulfur), which helps to naturally lengthen that phase. There are capsules (which are way too big to swallow, unless you’re brave lol) or  MSM powder which can be mixed with a beverage. I have heard that it is incredibly bitter in taste, so experiment with drinks to help mask the taste. Orange juice is a good option.

However, if you cannot get your hands on MSM, you can opt for eating foods high in sulfur content, such as in green veggies, fruits such as pineapple or bananas, legumes like lentils or black beans, or in nuts like almonds, cashews, walnuts, etc. 

Hope that helps! <3



Hi! Could you do tutorials on updos/roll, tuck, and pin hairstyles? They seem like they should be easy but I just can't get them right, and yours look wonderful! Thanks :) —by Anonymous

Hey! Thank you, and of course I will! :-) They are definitely super easy to do. I actually have a tutorial on a style rolling out next week. <3 



Hi :) I really love your blog, its helped me so much on my hair journey. My question is: how should I care for my hair before, during and after getting it blow dried and curled? should I do a protein treatment or deep condition? any tips to ensure minimal damage? thank you :) —by Anonymous

Hey! I’m very glad! :-) Thank you for sharing that <3

Doing a protein treatment would typically be the same as deep conditioning because you are infusing nutrients or   When deep conditioning, you are either using a protein-based conditioner or a moisturizing-based conditioner.  Since heat has the tendency to break down the hair shaft, do ensure that you are using a protein-based conditioner as protein helps to protect and to strengthen your strands from damage.

Even before using protein, incorporate a pre-shampoo treatment (or “pre-poo”) for 30 to 45 minutes or even overnight. A good option is coconut oil, which  is extremely effective at reducing protein loss and adding moisture—especially since blow-drying can be very drying to the hair. if you’r not a fan of coconut oil, you can definitely another oil of choice!

Also, use a heat protectant! Try staying away from anything with chemicals or synthetic ingredients, and go for a more natural solution! A great option is grapeseed oil, which has a smoking point of almost 400 degrees Fahrenheit :-) 

I hope that helps! For anyone else with blow drying tips or tips on using any form of heat, do share <3



What your protective style? —by Anonymous

Hey! I love my two strand twists :-) That’s definitely my favourite most low-maintenance protective style. 

As of recently, I really like doing simple updos just to change things up a bit. My go-to one at the moment is this particular style. It takes me five minutes to do, and it last for days :-)



is a silk bonnet alright to wear at night? —by Anonymous

Hey! You can definitely wear a silk bonnet. Satin is the more inexpensive variety, but no less effective than silk. However, silk is the much more durable fabric. Silk scarfs, pillowcases, or bonnets can be a little bit out of the budget for some (this is due to the lengthy process it takes to make it), but if you are willing to spend the extra cash, then definitely go for it :-)

Tip: For silk on the low, go to your nearby Goodwill or other thrift store! I once found a silk headscarf for $3 that was originally $25. Make sure you hand-wash the silk headscarf you find before wearing them though! :-) 



Is it safe to put shampoo on my scalp? —by Anonymous

Hey! Sulfate shampoos are extremely drying to the scalp. They contain detergents, meaning they completely remove oils/grease that water cannot otherwise do. However, in return, that means that sulfate shampoos will strip the scalp of it’s natural oil (sebum), which is not good. Sebum coats the cuticle and protects the follicles. If sulfates are used, it leaves the cuticles (the outside layer of hair) exposed. 

You can opt for sulfate free shampoos which are much, much more gentle and won’t strip the hair or scalp of its oils. Another great option to removing dirt or buildup is to consider doing an apple cider vinegar rinse! The acidity of apple cider vinegar helps to clear away any residue or buildup accumulated on the scalp and hair. Do make sure that you dilute ACV with water, because of how drying and acidic it is! 

You can also use a bentonite or rhassoul clay mask to cleanse the hair and scalp :-) I’ve heard great things about using clay masks! However, ACV is probably the cheapest solution if you’re on a budget. A 16 ounce bottle of Bragg’s Organic Apple Cider Vinegar ranges from $3 to $5 and last forever! The choice is yours! <3